DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial

Today I’m pleased to share a DIY IKEA sewing table tutorial showing you how to make a custom sewing table from your INGO dining table.  It’s a lot easier than you think!  If I can do it, you can do it.

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Please read through the entire instructions before beginning this project so you get a good overview of what we’ll be doing.  It’s sometimes easier to see photos of the later stages of the project in order to understand the earlier steps.

If you’ve just bought your INGO, make sure to fully assemble it before beginning this tutorial.  Later in the project we’ll be removing the tabletop but you need the table fully assembled to start.  Just follow the always-easy-to-understand IKEA assembly instructions and let’s begin!

Supplies:

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Disclaimer: I don’t endorse the brands pictured above and have no knowledge regarding any of their potential defects or safety issues.

  • Ikea INGO or other dining/kitchen table with a rail under the tabletop (this tutorial is not for Ikea tables where you pick a top piece and legs separately –you need that rail underneath in order to attach the support beams that will hold your machine).
  • 1 board to use as a shelf on which your machine will sit under your table.  Must be at least 2 inches longer and wider than your machine.  I have a Janome MC 6600P and used a 12” wide, 21” long shelf left over from our new Ikea kitchen cabinets.  I left it 12” wide and just cut it to the proper length.
  • 1 wood 2×2.  It needs to be at least twice the width of your table (if you’re using the same table as me you’ll need one that’s at least 52” long so you can cut it into two 26” long pieces).
  • Safety goggles (DUH)
  • Jigsaw
  • Medium and fine grit sandpaper
  • Wood filler
  • Miter or hand saw (to cut your 2×2’s to size)
  • Drill
    • ¼” drill bit
    • Countersink bit
  • Mini Kreg Jig Kit
  • C-clamp
  • 4 1 ¼” wood screws
  • 4 bolts (4” long, ¼” diameter) –it’s best to use bolts that have threading at least halfway up the length of the bolt, since you’ll be using these bolts to get your shelf to the correct height.
  • 8 washers
  • 8 nuts
  • 4 bolt caps

Construction

Place your sewing machine on top of the table and find a spot where you feel it’s comfortable for you to sew.  My machine is about 4.5” from the front edge and about 17” from the left edge.

Trace the outline of your machine onto your tabletop.  If you’d like room for your cords to tuck underneath, make sure to account for that bit of extra space when you’re tracing.  If you have an acrylic extension table, make sure you trace around it as well if you want it to remain attached to your machine.

Carefully cut along your traced line with your jigsaw to create the hole in which your machine will fit.  It helps to have someone holding the table still for you as you cut.  Go slowly, especially around the corners.  It takes some finesse to get nicely rounded corners (however, some sewing machines have square edges, in which case you’ll be cutting a perfect rectangle).  This was my first time using a jigsaw and my corners were far from perfect!

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Now insert your machine to see if it fits snugly in the hole you just cut.  Mine didn’t fit right away so I had to sand the edges down a bit more and kept inserting my machine and sanding the edges until it fit (which, with a 25-pound machine, was quite a workout!).  Don’t worry if it doesn’t fit on the first try –your tracing lines can be tough to get perfect so consider your initial hole to be a starting point (unless you are an expert tracer and jigsawer).  :)

Once your hole is the right size and you’ve made sure your machine fits snugly, sand all the cut edges, first with a medium grit sandpaper to take care of the really rough parts and then with the fine grit to get it smooth and flat.  The hole I cut splintered a bit in some areas.  I removed the splinters and filled those spots in with wood filler, let it dry completely per package instructions, then sanded those areas smooth as well until I got a nice, flat surface with no splinters or gashes.

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Next, flip your entire table over and measure the distance between the front and back rails.  (If you’re using the same INGO table as me, it should measure 26”.)  Cut your 2×2 into two pieces the same length as the distance between the rails and check their placement to make sure they fit snugly in between the rails.

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Now trace a line a couple of inches from each short side of your jigsawed hole (the line will be parallel to the short sides).  You’ll use these lines later as a guide to attach your 2×2’s (which, by the way, are NOT 2 inches by 2 inches!  I learned that “2×2’s” are actually 1.5” x 1.5” –how confusing, right?!).

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

I didn’t make any exact measurements here; I simply used the width of my level as my guide.  The only real rule is that your line must be at least 2 inches from your hole in order to accommodate the width of the 2×2’s (yes, the not-actually-2-inches-by-2-inches 2-by-2’s).

Whip out your NIFTY kreg jig kit, clamp it securely to your 2×2 (hint: use a paint stirrer on the underside so your clamp doesn’t dig into the 2×2), attach the drill bit that comes with the kit and use it to drill pocket holes into each end of both of your 2×2’s.  READ THE INSTRUCTIONS that come with the kit to make sure you’re clamping the kreg jig the proper distance from the edge.  The length of the screws you use dictates the distance the kreg jig must be attached from the edge.  Ours will need to accommodate 1 ¼” screws.  You should now have 4 pocket holes!

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Next, line up the outer edge of your 2×2’s with the lines you traced on the underside of your table and attach your 2×2’s to the front and back table rails using the 1 ¼” wood screws through the pocket holes we just made.  I must say, making and using pocket holes will make you feel LEGIT.  Just a small step away from being Tim the Tool Man Taylor, really.

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Once your 2×2’s are attached, mark where the 4 bolts will go that will hold up the shelf with your sewing machine.  BE CAREFUL NOT TO MARK THEM TOO CLOSE TO THE FRONT EDGE OF YOUR TABLE, AS THAT’S WHERE YOUR POCKET HOLE SCREWS ARE.  I marked about 3 inches in front and behind my machine hole.  (I apologize for the lack of photo for this part.)

Next, unscrew and remove JUST your tabletop from your table and set it aside.  Everything else (the table legs, the rail around the perimeter, the 2×2’s) should remain intact.  You are JUST removing the table top so you can install your bolts, which will be countersunk into the 2×2’s.

Attach your ¼” drill bit and drill 4 holes all the way through your 2×2’s, at the spots you marked previously (you’ll notice that the mark in my photo is NOT where I’m drilling the hole.  That’s because the first time I drilled at my mark, I hit the wood screw attaching my 2×2 to the rail!  Hence the disclaimer above about making sure your marks aren’t near your wood screws!  Trial by fire, folks.).

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Now attach your countersink bit and drill sink holes into the top of the 4 drilled holes you just made.  The countersink bit only goes about ½” inch deep so that your bolts, when inserted, are flush with the top of your 2×2’s but do not go all the way through.  Test that your bolts fit by sliding them through the holes you just made and ensuring that their tops are nicely flush with the top of your 2×2’s.  You should be left with a flat surface on which to reattach your tabletop.  Remove the bolts and set them aside for now.

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Now turn your table base upside down, setting it on top of the shelf you’ll be using to hold your machine (mine in the picture has NOT been cut to its proper length yet, which is why it looks too long).

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Line up your shelf about ½” past each 2×2 and use the 4 holes you just made in the 2×2’s as a guide to begin drilling those same holes into your shelf (it helps to have someone holding your table and shelf steady as you do this).  This will ensure that the holes in your 2×2’s and the ones in your shelf line up perfectly for the bolts that will be holding them together.  DON’T DRILL ALL THE WAY THROUGH YOUR SHELF AT THIS POINT.  RATHER, DRILL LITTLE PILOT HOLES, THEN REMOVE YOUR SHELF FROM UNDER THE TABLE AND PLACE IT ON A STURDY SURFACE TO FINISH DRILLING THOSE 4 HOLES ALL THE WAY THROUGH.  Put your shelf aside.

It’s time to put the table back together!

Assembly

First, place your bolts through the holes you made previously so that the top of the bolts are pointed up, and the threads are hanging underneath your table.  Again, the tops of your bolts should be flush with the surface of the 2×2’s, thanks to the countersink holes we drilled earlier.

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Hold the bolts in place so they don’t slip out, and carefully flip the table back over onto the tabletop.  Reattach the tabletop to your [revamped!] base per IKEA’s original assembly instructions.

Once you’ve reassembled your table and place it right side up, it should basically just look like a table with a hole in the top.  It’s only upon looking underneath that you’ll be able to see your masterful carpentry :)

Finally!  Let’s attach the shelf upon which your machine will live.

Your bolts will now be hanging down underneath your table.  Mount the shelf by assembling in the following order for each bolt:

NUT –> WASHER –> SHELF –> WASHER –> NUT

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

You’ll notice that my bolts in the picture are a BIT too long.  The ones I used on my table are actually ½” longer than the ones I recommend in my supplies list, so if you buy them per the supplies list you should be good to go.  I’ll probably cut these down or disassemble my table and replace them with 4″ bolts one of these days, but for now my too-long ones aren’t proving to be a problem.

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

(For an ultra-stable shelf, we’re securing nuts on each side of it rather than just underneath it.  This adds some extra tension to keep your nuts from loosening from the shaking that occurs while you sew.)

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Once you’ve installed the shelf by assembling the nuts and washers for all 4 holes in the order listed above, place your machine on your shelf and simply tighten or loosen the nuts until your machine is sitting at a height that is flush with the surface of your table top.

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Put bolt caps on the bottoms of your bolts, especially if you have kiddos!  You really want to protect your littles from hitting the bolts if they decide to play underneath your table.  If you can’t find caps the size of your bolts (I had a hard time), I would try sticking some cotton balls on the ends and covering them with duct tape to provide some cushion and protection.

Now set aside your machine, pull your cords up through the hole, and place your machine back on the shelf.

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

Plug in your cords, turn on your machine, and put the pedal to the metal!  You’re finished!

DIY IKEA Sewing Table Tutorial - from Marta with Love

You’ll notice I painted my table as well.  Here’s the tutorial I followed to a tee for the paint job.

Looks a lot nicer than those overpriced, plastic sewing tables, eh?  It’s cheaper, uber chic, and you get the privilege of saying you made this custom sewing table with your own two hands.  :)  Win-win-win.

ENJOY, and be sure to leave me a comment here or e-mail me if you make this table yourself using my tutorial.  I’d love to hear your experience and see the finished product!

Also, please visit Carrie’s blog and give her some love.  When I came home from buying my precious Janome with a picture of the shop’s expensive custom tables fresh in my Droid, hers was the first tutorial I came across that gave me the confidence to say “You know what?  I can do this, too!”

Comments

  1. says

    Umm…okay. Could I maybe just pay you and your mister to do this for me? You say it’s easy, but I don’t think you and I are speaking the same language, here. :)

    It’s GORGEOUS by the way. I’m super jealous. :)

  2. says

    Wowee! That looks so great. I don’t really have room for this at the present time, but I think it’s something I could totally tackle someday (provided someone loaned me some tools!) What an ambitious tutorial, and pulled off very well. :)

  3. says

    After reading this very carefully, I must say it doesn’t look too difficult. I think I will send my hub a link as a Christmas gift idea. Even easier if I don’t have to do it myself:) Great tutorial!

  4. Patricia LoCascio says

    What a great tutorial! I read the whole thing and think I could actually do this! really good instructions, really clear. Good job, it’s beautiful!

    • Marta says

      Thanks, Melody! But these expensive tables are the reason I wanted to show you how make one yourself for less than $100. The $600 from Tony’s tables would be MUCH better spent on fabric hoarding! ;)

      • Deb Myers says

        and…. marta, your IKEA/INGO table is soooo cute….so much more attractive than metal! great job!!

  5. says

    This is so clever! If I had a place to do carpentry, I would totally give this a try. Custom sewing tables are so expensive and I love doing Ikea hacks. :)

  6. says

    i love it so much! you did a great job with this tutorial and if my husband hadn’t already made me a table i would totally go this route! isn’t it awesome having a handy husband! that can be taken two ways…. ;) xoxo

    • Marta says

      AHEM –Mike is GREAT and all, but this was 95% Marta! When I say “if I can do it, you can do it,” I ain’t foolin’, girl. Mike was out of town the week I decided to do this, and you KNOW I can’t just sit around and wait for him. He came back when I was assembling the stuff underneath and helped by drilling a couple holes and posing for pictures. We don’t need no stinkin’ man! Okay, maybe we do, just not necessarily to build us a sewing table ;) ;) Love you to bits!

      • says

        Marta, you are spot on! I find it funny that people think my husband is doing most of the work then it comes to my DIY projects that involve power tools and all. We girls can do it too :)

  7. jojomatt says

    Love it! I use an old butcher block kitchen table now and never thought of cutting out for the machine. I am tall so I like my machine higher then most.
    I IMMEDIATELY called my husband in to check it out. I just might get it done after all. Thank you for posting it.

  8. says

    Love this… been collecting ideas for my not-so-functional, clutter-haven sewing/craft room. Your tutorial is jumping right to the top of the list. Thanks so much for sharing.

  9. says

    Hey, this looks great, and super for sewing flat things. I love the idea, and might ask my hubs to make it for me for a christmas gift! I am wondering what you do when you have to sew a leg hem or sleeve or shoulder? You know, what I mean? My machine sits atop a desk-type deal, and I pull off the the end of the machine so that I can slip a circular thing over it. I guess I could lift the machine up and onto the desk for that purpose.

    • Marta says

      Hey, Nancy!

      Unfortunately the machine I have, whether on a sewing table or on a normal table, isn’t great for clothing. This is one of the ONLY things, in fact, that I dislike about it (it’s purely a quilting machine). I have a cheap Brother with an open arm that I use for top-stitching bags and hemming sleeves and such, so I don’t ever take my Janome out of the table to do sleeves.

      If your machine does have an open arm, though, I would do as you mentioned and set it on the flat part of your table just while you’re using that open arm.

      Let me know if you have any other questions –I’m happy to help! Have a lovely week :)

      • says

        Hey, thanks for the info! I don’t quilt, but mostly make accessories, home dec, some clothing, costumes, things like that…not to mention repairing my son’s torn favorite (every one of them!) clothing items. Anyways, the flat table would be really nice for larger home dec projects, but because I do use that removable arm a lot, I think the lower-mount isn’t for me.
        It’s a wonderful looking table, and there’s nothing better than putting your effort into something and it turns out to be great and super-useful!!

  10. says

    Hey Marta – This is awesome. I may even be able to handle it myself. (never used a jigsaw!!). I even have a table already that I could use.

    btw – I saw that you are going to Sew South. Me too! I have enjoyed your blog for a while, it will be so fun to meet you for real!!

  11. lisa m says

    Well done and great tutorial! For nice rounded corners, I like to drill a hole in each corner of the space I’m cutting out…and that way you don’t have to turn your jigsaw. And all lumber is sized by how big they cut it before they run it through the machine which finishes the surfaces nice and smooth–kinda like quilt blocks :-)

  12. Betty Crenshaw says

    LOVE this tutorial. Thank you!! I notice you have a top loading bobbin on your machine. Do you think this set up would work with a front (underneath) bobbin? Might it be too difficult to get at the bobbin once the machine is in place?

  13. happierthanabirdquilts says

    This is so awesome! Thank you! When I upgraded my machine it no longer fit in my sewing table so I’m on top of a sad little folding table, and even with that plexiglass “table” quilting is a pain in the butt. I think I’ll be asking my hubby to make this for my birthday!

  14. Marlene says

    My sister posted this on her FB page! So glad she did! This is awesome! Wish I had more space so I could have one! Don’t think hubby would appreciate me cutting a hole in the diningroom table! :) One suggestion – if you have a dremel, you could cut off the ends of the screws once you are finished aligning the machine. Then you don’t have anything except the bolts to worry about with the ‘little’s! Why is it that is always their fav place to play? Mine were ALWAYS under the table when I was sewing!

  15. Gertie Pye says

    This is such a fantastic tutorial! I am hoping to buy a new machine soon, hopefully with a view to doing some FMQ’ing, but really I need a table that my machine can sit in to FMQ, but I can’t afford the machine AND the table! However this looks quite affordable. And I’m sure I can convince my other half to have a go at this (especially when he sees how much Horn tables cost!)

  16. Tracy says

    I have been wanting to do something similar but my Pfaff has the bobbin that is underneath the needle plate. One day I will figure out how to put a latch or swing arm on the table so I can get at my bobbin. I quilt, so I need to get to it often.

  17. doug says

    There is one last finishing touch you need to make this build totally awesome. Countersink the holes in the sewing machine support board to hide the nuts at the end of the bolts. Use a countersink wide enough so that both the nut and washer fit. Cut the bolt to size or buy a slightly shorter bolt so that nothing projects below the support board. Your knees will thank you.

  18. Wendy Somerville says

    Marta this is a fabulous Tutorial and I am already purchasing the necessary supplies. ie Table from Ikea etc. Our Ikea store is just opening here on Wednesday. ;-)) Yeah!!
    However, I have a Babylock Quilters Dream Machine and it too, as others have mentioned, has the bobbin underneath. Any idea how I could make a trap door to reach it? Please let me know if you have any ideas on this.

    My on/off button will also be below the table top so I will have to make some adjustments there as well.

    Thank you so much for the impressive tutorial. ;-)

    • Wendy Somerville says

      I have come up with a design for this table for machines that have a front loading bobbin like my BabyLock. I also have an acrylic quilting table which will be incorportated into the top. I will let Marta know and send her pics to post when it is finished. ;-)

      • Valerie Sanchez says

        can you share the design for the front loading bobbin please? My husband working on this project for me. Just bought a Bernina

      • says

        Hello Valerie, I have not made the table yet. I had so many other projects on the go.. However, my design idea for a front loading bobbin was to just notch out the front area of the table. (the piece of wood that drops down in front. Not all of it across the whole front of the table, just an area in front of the sewing machine so it is easier to get your hand to reach the bobbin case. I have a clear acrylic table quilting table that I will incorporate into the top as if came with the Babylock machine. I can see the bobbin case readily. Not sure if your Bernina has this or not. Hope this helps your hubby.

  19. says

    This makes me want a new sewing machine – one with a top load bobbin. I have an old drop in table that I got from my mother in law’s estate, and I have to haul the machine out ever time I change the bobbin. Such a pita.

  20. Jody says

    This will work as long as you have a drop in from the top bobbin style machine or you will need to lift it out to access the bobbin case from underneath. I notched my table in the front for my bobbin access.

  21. always alice says

    Hubby and I have done this to an old kitchen table we found…….but using the nuts and bolts for adjustment was such a great idea!!! Will keep that in mind if we ever do this again…..Thanks!

  22. says

    I just did this for my lovely wife and worked almost perfect. I didnt do my conversions from imperial to metric too well and at first the machine sat too deep into the recess with no way of raising the platform. The original cut out fixed that quick smart. It now sits on the platform.

    Thanks for the simple instructions
    Cheers
    Glenn

  23. Shannon Murphy says

    Thank You. I made this with a drop leaf table that was going to the fire place, love it when not in use I can drop the sides to save space.

  24. Florence says

    Hi ! We live in France, and we are now making the sewing table following your instructions !! It is a great process, first times (drilling, using a saw…). It is very challenging. When the table is ready, we can say, we did it ourselves !! I am very excited. Thanks for your tutorial !!

  25. juan says

    I want to make this for my gf’s birthday. Is this IKEA table sturdy enough to resist the movement of the sewing machine? I’d like to hear someone’s experience using it.

    Thanks!

    • says

      Hi, Juan! I’ve been using my table for months now, and it hasn’t loosened a bit. It feels just as tight and sturdy as it did the day I built it, and my machine weighs a hefty 26 pounds! Even when I’m sewing on my highest speed, the table doesn’t shake. I hope that eases your apprehension :)

  26. says

    Hi Marta,

    Recently stumbled across this tut, and what a blessing. I have quilted my last quilt with a raised machine! I spent this afternoon transforming my Ikea table into a flatbed, with the help of your instructions. The adjustable bolts were an inspiration. You are right, it is not hard to do. I had only a little help from the mister in the house, mainly I used his tools, but did most of it myself. I had to adjust for a bottom loading bobbin, and my plug-in cord, but otherwise it is great. Can’t wait to get back to sewing. I’ll be linking you up with my own blog. Thank you, thank you.

  27. says

    just a suggestion… put some Loctite thread locker on the bolts underneath the table to hold the nuts in place for good, and you can take off the extra bolt length with a hacksaw or Dremel disc. just cut it flush with the bottom nut OR leave a half inch and cap them with rubber vacuum line caps from an auto parts store.

  28. Shelley Gardner says

    I would have drilled two holes near the back side of the sewing machine for the cords to go through so that they weren’t pinched along the machine. If you drilled a hole along the line that you would cut later, you would end up with a half circles after cutting the space out for the full machine. Love the rest of your design, and as the others have said, a few tweaks could improve upon your design for an even lovelier table.

  29. April Lauer says

    I wonder if u can do this same thing to a really nice desk with drawers? Or can u add little compartment on the right side of the machine to hold tools. Like a cute little organizing holders. But also I saved the old lift that came with a older sewing machine cabinet I had and I wish I could use that on a table like this. I thought to save that thing in hopes I can re use it someday. I have 2 large drafting tables I bet I could do this on them but the shelf on it that’s under them is in the back. But if u turned it around sure the shelf would work but no place for your legs. Plus it’s a deep shelf. My machine is huge though. Just wish I could do this with the tables I have. Don’t have money to go buy a ikea table right now. But if I get money later maybe I could if I can’t do this with any other table I have. And what about if u wanted to change the machines to the hole? Guess would have to custom order a plexi to fit to those machines in the same hole?

  30. Livie R. says

    I made my own sewing table using a desk I bought from Office Depot. It has 3 drawers, one of them very deep (for files), a closet on the other side, and a pullout keyboard stand, on which I placed the sewing machine (I made sure to anchor it underneath). My husband used a jigsaw to cut out the hole for the sewing machine. I love it, because of all the drawers. It also has a hole for the cords, which I use for loose threads by placing a plastic cup underneath to catch the threads.

  31. Kathleen Williams says

    Wow! Thanks for the idea and the tutorial. I can do this. I was thinking that I’d get additional tables to extend the surfaces to be able to get a huge quilt on it and also have cutting surfaces when not quilting. I’m thinking of getting 4 of the tables, cutting one up to fit the sewing machine. I’d stow one table behind the sewing table and two tables adjacent to the sewing table and other table. This would create a huge working surface that would be far cheaper than anything than can be purchased. Sweet. Thank you so much.

  32. Beth F. says

    Wow, this is awesome. Marta, how heavy is that machine? I would love this for my Juki 2010q but its 25ish lbs and I wonder if the bolts could support that weight?

  33. NellyKelly says

    Oh my goodness, you win Bestest Blogger for sure…. This is an amazing tutorial with an amazing end product! And I have the exact same sewing machine, so I can see just what the end result will be, no worrying that it’ll be too heavy or too deep. I’m trying to FMQ a moderately big quilt right now with the machine sitting on top of a folding table from Target. The combination of height, vibration, and friction/pulling is making this one feel like a long haul. Thank you, thank you, thank you. I’ve been avoiding buying a premade table because of the cost and the look (because it has to live in the dining room of my open plan house.) This is so perfect!! Thanks again!

  34. Gaye Galyan says

    Just finished making your sewing table. Your instructions were amazing – my husband thought your instructions were just as good as IKEAs – and he loves IKEAs instructions! Thank you so much for making a sewing table so affordable and fun. Now on to the painting…

  35. Nenna says

    I am so excited to have found this tutorial! I really need a good sewing machine table (the folding table I’m using sooo does not cut the mustard) and can’t afford to spend upwards of $500 on a new one. I just happen to have this exact table (it’s our old kitchen table that’s now serving as our outdoor dining table), and I’m going to play Bob Vila and transform it into a sewing table. If it wasn’t 10:30 pm, I’d be reaching for the jigsaw right now!

  36. says

    Just curious – when you painted and finished it, did you use the wax or a polyurethane? How does it deal with drag on larger items that you are sewing and sliding across the table? As a quilter, that is my biggest concern with this :) I just custom built a 5′ x 5′ table that will do triple duty as a dining table, sewing table, and homeschool work center for 3 kids. The last thing to work out is what finish I’m putting on it!

  37. says

    I used your tutorial to make my Inga sewing table today and your instructions are awesome! I’m planning to paint mine with an enamel paint to maximize smooth glide of fabrics. Thanks again!

  38. Jacquie says

    This is so clever. I will be trying this very soon. I am just about ready to start some serious quilting.

  39. Kelly says

    This is a wonderful, practical and inexpensive! You just saved me a fortune! Sewing tables are ridiculously over priced!! Thank you for sharing!

  40. Leah says

    Hi Marta, I just finished making a sewing table following your instructions to the letter! It turned out wonderfully and I am so grateful for your fabulous tutorial! thank you so much!
    -Leah

  41. says

    I’ve heard a lot about using Ikea tables to make a really good sewing table. With instructions like these you’re gonna put people like me out of business!

    Also, some people use Ikea’s little stackable cubby boxes to outfit their sewing spaces. I couldn’t find the link for the picture I saw but it’s another idea to go along with it. And you just have to stop at Ikea once for everything!

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